Joe and Lu Nutt Queen Suite - Room 5

This cozy room is the overall truest Nutt House experience if that's what you're searching for. This room is housed atop of the illustrious original Grand Stair Case, erected in 1910. Located deep within the heart of this one of a kind Historic structure, this intimate room provides the very best of all that Granbury has to offer! In 1910 this area of the hotel was once the glamorous location of the state of the art ladie's and gentleman's bathing rooms, furnished with huge claw-foot tubs and chain flush wall-mounted toilets! During a renovation in 2002, the communal baths were removed and private baths were added to each suite. This area of the historic hotel was converted into usable spaces to include this charming room! This has long been a preferred location for people who've stayed with us "Long Term."

This suite is the only room to have two doors on either side of it, although one is locked for your comfort and security purposes. The bath is absolutely gorgeous, and is only one of two suites that have an all in one shower and bath unit. The floors and light fixtures are very luxurious, and this room also has visible two of the original cypress forty-foot beams that support the spine of the hotel structure.

If you want to experience the Nutt House in all of it's glory, this is the right room for you! It's the only room that has inner windows (equipped with shutters like the rest!) overlooking the enjoy the Grand Sitting Room. You won't miss out on the great outside views. Just a few steps take you to the Grand Sitting Room with the scenic vistas visible from the large arched windows on the south side front of the hotel. This cheerful room provides a "Birds Eye View" of it all, and yet provides the customary privacy levels of a traditional Bed and Breakfast!

(See Joe and Lu Nutt biographical information below.)

Rates: $90 during Weekdays Sun-Wed
$119 during Weekends Thurs-Sat


Joe and Lu Nutt Historical Mini-Biography

Joe Lewis Nutt grew up in nearby Ft. Worth, spending summers in Granbury and then left the area during to serve in World War II. After the war, he married his wife Lu, and made his money in the then thriving educational film business. After he sold his film company and retired in the early 1960's, he and Lu moved to a small town near Denver, Colorado. They loved their life there and were active in the community, and in the Denver theatre and arts scene. But something kept calling Joe Nutt to come home. Finally in 1966, after a visit to Granbury to see his niece Mary Lou Watkins, Joe and Lu made their decision to move back.

Inspired by the restoration project Mary Lou had begun on the old family home (The Bridge Street History Center), and intrigued by the possibilities presented by the soon to be reality of Lake Granbury, Joe and Lu bought a lot down the street from the old home place and built a house. Not just any ordinary house either, it was a split level native rock house with palatial rooms, a view of the Lambert Branch creek, and an indoor swimming pool! Clearly Joe and Lu were home to stay and they set about to see how they could follow in the time honored Nutt family tradition of community involvement.

Joe's first "project" was partnering with Mary Lou Watkins bringing the old Nutt Hotel property back into the family. They bought it back from Norman and Jewel Strain, and set about turning it into a viable business. With Mary Lou firmly at the helm of that project, Joe and Lu turned their attention to the other side of the Granbury Square. Lu, a talented musician and patron of the arts, was intrigued by the possibilities presented by the old Granbury Opera House building, built in 1886 by Donald Kerr. In its turn of the century heyday, the second floor of the building with the red tin roof had been the cultural Mecca for a thriving community. Then it sat, abandoned, dilapidated, caved-in roof and broken windows open to the broad Texas sky. Yet, to Joe and Lu it represented a vision of what Granbury had been once, and could become again- a thriving, prosperous gathering place for folks from all around.

So, Joe and Lu, and their friends Judge Jack and Dora Lee Langdon, and couple of others met and cobbled together a plan. They arranged to purchase the old Opera House building and then gave it to their newly formed foundation- The Granbury Opera House Association. And the rest, as they say, is history. With little funding up front, and no real idea of how much it might take, they rallied the community, inspired volunteers, got cash and labor and got materials donated. Joe formed a serendipitous business relationship with veteran performer and showman Jo Ann Miller, who came to Granbury for the weekend to play golf, and ended up staying for a lifetime. Joe and Lu and Jo Ann formed an indomitable team dedicated to making the Granbury Opera House the premier live theatre in the North Texas area.

In making that goal a working reality, they breathed life back into the Granbury that Joe had loved all his life. Joe became known as "the father of the Granbury Opera House". After the Opera House was secure, Joe pursued a lifelong dream of owning Comanche Peak, the flat topped mesa that was sacred to the local Native Americans, and a landmark seen for the first time by his ancestors who came here so many years ago. His love for the town, the area and the land is reflected in this quote: "As a small boy growing up in Fort Worth, I loved to come with my parents back to Granbury," Nutt recalls. "On the road from Cresson, you come through a gap in the hills, framed by trees – and there, spread out before you, is this valley of the 'River of the Many Arms of God.' On the horizon, dominating it all, is the long, blue shadow of this mountain. It's best on a clear day, when you can see over perhaps a dozen counties from this summit." We like to think that Joe is still looking down on us here- and still enjoying the view.